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assess what the u.s. and the world are doing now, and what comes next. >> ifill: plus, we examine what the unrest in the middle east is doing to gas prices here at home. >> woodruff: then, we have the first of two reports from guatemala. tonight, ray suarez looks at programs aimed at combating a long history of domestic violence. >> suarez: as part of a nationwide effort to improve women's health these workshops are pushing back against a rape culture trying to lower the epidemic levels of violence against women and girls. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks to scott shane of the new york times about the obama administration's decision to resume military trials at the guantanamo bay prison. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has helped millions of americans build a secure financial future. wouldn't it be nice to take a deep breath and rel
used helicopters to try to drop cooling water from above. but the winds and radiation levels forced it to be abandoned. he appeared on television to try to reassure his people. people are not reassured. we found families dashing to board trains south. what are you most worried about? >> i am most worried about the nuclear plants because i have small children. i want to stay far away from tokyo. >> many people live and work in tokyo come from other parts of japan. families are leaving tokyo for other parts of japan because of the fear of radiation. leaving is not an option for many. there are not enough places to go. if there is a major leak of radiation there does not seem to be a plan either. the family has not been told about it. they are watching developments further north with consternation. they have a baby and don't trust what the government is telling them. >> the government says we are safe but i don't think so. i don't trust them. >> one that? >> because [unintelligible] >> what is this? this is new? >> instead they are making their own plans. a car standing by to head sout
of nuclear energy here in the u.s., we continue our coverage of japan's massive earthquake. you're watching "nightly business report" for monday, march 14. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. my colleague tom hudson is off tonight. it's day four of japan's monstrous earthquake and tsunami, and the full brunt of the damage is still unknown. the death toll is expected to exceed 10,000 and the country continues to battle the threat of a catastrophic nuclear accident. now japan is focused on the enormous human suffering, but attention around the world is also shifting to the economic consequences of the disaster. many economists believe the country is likely to slide into recession. so what will that mean for the rest of the world? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: there's no question the human toll of japan's epic earthquake and tsunam
in u.s. treasuries. >> tom: we ask pimco's bill gross why he's bailing out of government debt and where he's putting money now. you're watching "nightly business" report for wednesday, march 9. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> susie: good evening, everyone. the world's largest bond fund is betting against bonds. pimco's total return fund has sold off its government bond holdings to zero as of the end of february. tom, this is a strong signal from pimco's flagship fund that it sees little value in owning u.s. treasuries. >> tom: susie, as a result of those bond sales, pimco is sitting on $54 billion of cash. the fund still owns other kinds of bonds. it's holdings are diversified among mortgage bonds, corporate debt, foreign bonds and municipal securities. >> susie: so what's the reason behind the bond fire sale? joining us now: william gross, the founder and co-chief investment officer of pimco. hi, bill,
. >> tell us a little about supplies. what is day to day life like in terms of food and water and electricity, and just getting around town? >> the situation in northeastern japan is quite desperate. although, my son, who has just come back to us from sendai, closer in to the city, told us infrastructure is starting to be restored. you walk into tokyo, and there are no neon lights, and there much fewer people walking around the town. it is a bizarre, unsettling atmosphere. >> are people in an orderly fashion, or are they panicky? >> i would say in a lot of senses, this is japanese population's finest hour. in tokyo, as i mentioned earlier, there is a great frustration and anxiety level, but there are also a lot of people saying, you know, we have to pull ourselves together. >> you can hear my complete conversation with lucy, including more on her son's ordeal, on our website, nbron meanwhile, concerns about those damaged nuclear reactors in japan spooked investor confidence, and stock markets around the world sold off. here in the u.s., the panic- selling swept through wall st
around the globe warn about the risks and u.s. stocks get whipsawed. >> tom: as the situation unfolds, how is the nuclear industry responding to the escalating crisis? and what is in store for investors? you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, march 16. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. fears escalated today around the world about the nuclear crisis in japan. comments from energy officials in europe and the u.s. raised questions about danger from the damaged reactors, tom. >> tom: susie, these were stark comments from top global experts. europe's energy chief said japan's dai-ichi nuclear plant was "effectively out of control." the u.s. energy secretary said there was a "partial meltdown" there. additionally, americans within 50 miles of the area were urged to evacuate. >> susie: and tom, those warnings spooked u.s. stock investors, sendin
captioning sponsored by wpbt . >> disasters like this remind us of the common humanity we share. >> president obama works to ease fears at home saying the u.s. is not at risk from the radiation. >> susie: japan's disaster is raising questions about u.s. nuclear liability and the yen's continued surge as we continue our coverage of the japanese crisis. you're watching nightly business report for thursday, march 17th. >> this is nightly business this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, thanks for joining us tonight. president obama said today japan's nuclear crisis won't affect the united states, susie. >> susie: you know, tom, the president spoke this afternoon from the white house rose garden and said he doesn't expect a nuclear radiation to be a risk for people inside the united states. >> i want to be very clear. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states
a slaughter or has no not indicd he's willing to act and the senate arms committee believed the u.s. had to show it was full my prepared to step in and showing the prepared to step in and senator kerry said said we failed to act in rwanda and the slowness to react in bosnia and under the first president bush encouraged the shia to do an uprising against saddam hussein and didn't come to their aid as well and there are all kinds of ghosts haunting the error and president obama is very cautious at his core that every time the united states has gone into intervene in the middle east there's been a long-term consequence to the perception of our position that's been negative. >> charlie: ann marie, tell me what the options are. >> the first best option is a negotiated solution that gets qaddafi and his family out of office and out of the country and that is actually still a possibility on the table. he made an offer, obviously it's hard to know who's saying what but the fact is we've been putting a lot of pressure on him both outside the country in terms of sanctions and in terms of diplomati
nuclear plant used water cannons, heavy duty fire hoses, and military helicopters in an effort to cool down overheating fuel rods, but it's not clear that anything has worked. president obama said today there was no risk to any u.s. territory from the reactors. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the containment operations, the ongoing exodus of people from areas close to the reactors, and new footage from when the tsunami struck six days ago. >> woodruff: and amid signs of both resilience and confusion, we look at japan's political culture in response to the disaster. >> brown: then, ray suarez has an update on libya, as the u.n. moves to a vote on establishing a no-fly zone over the country. >> woodruff: margaret warner talks to irish prime minister enda kenny about the celtic tiger's struggle to kick-start it's economy. >> brown: and tom bearden reports on a project to use private satellites to help stop genocide. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has be
in the u.s., the financial markets ignored those debt concerns. but erika miller looks at why american investors may want to pay attention to the crisis in portugal. >> reporter: for the past few weeks, investors have had plenty of distractions, ranging from political upheaval in egypt and libya to natural disasters and nuclear problems in japan to sharply higher oil prices. but today, the spotlight was on a problem many thought had gone away-- the european debt crisis. the fall of the portuguese government has pushed that country's borrowing rates to record levels, making it more difficult for portugal to get a handle on it's debt. economist brian levitt says the fear in financial markets is that portugal could need an expensive bailout. >> the big fear about the fall of the government in portugal is that they are not going to go through the austerity measures that they need, that the larger euro-economies want for them to go through in order to get additional credit facilities. >> reporter: another fear is contagion, reinforced by credit rating agency moody's downgrade of more than 3
earthquake will do to japan's fragile economy and the global markets. here in the u.s. despite the japan's stock index tumbled almost 180 points closing just minutes after the earthquake hit. >> tom: we spoke with our correspondent in tokyo. and began by asking lucy craft what's the initial assessment of damage to businesses and industry in japan. >> companies hit quite hard. sony, hond on, toyota, the major auto makers have a lot of factories up in northeastern japan. there's been a range of damage to these companies. so those factories will be kind of knocked out of operation for various amounts of time. fortunately, the northeastern area of japan is very sparsely populated. this is -- if you compare this to the kobe earthquake of 16 years ago, it accounts for a much smaller amount of gdp. >> reporter: what have you learned about the damage to the trainl systems and infrastructure? >> we haven't heard about the damage to the train system which is a major source of transportation here. when you talk about energy, though, it's a whole different ball of wax, and there's a lot of different
. president obama said the u.s. and the world must be ready to act rapidly if the crisis in libya deteriorates. and he didn't rule out the use of a no-fly zone over the country. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the fierce fighting in the oil city of brega and the exodus of refugees fleeing the violence. >> woodruff: plus, we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali who denounced moammar qaddafi last week. >> brown: then, as states battle public sector unions, we have a newsmaker interview with afl-cio chief, richard trumka. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the outcry over hikes in insurance premiums in california. >> the new higher health insurance rates for individuals have sparked protests and calls for the government to step in. >> brown: and hari sreenivasan examines mexico's deadly drug wars, as president felipe calderon visits the white house. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds grea
by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. president obama put libya on notice today saying the u.s. and its allies are ready for military action. tom, the president's message was aimed at libyan leader moammar qaddafi. >> tom: susie, speaking at the white house, president obama said qaddafi must end the violence and pull back troops from towns under attack. >> let me be clear, these terms are not negotiable. if qaddafi does not comply, the resolution will be enforced through military action. >> susie: ahead of the president's warning, libya said it's ceasing all military action and will begin talking with opposition groups. that came after a vote at the united nations calling for a no- fly zone over the country. not surprisingly, oil markets were volatile today. crude prices closed down 35 cents to settle at $101 a barrel, off their high of $103. as suzanne pratt reports the oil market is coping with a long list of issues. >> reporter: in the past week much of the world has been fixated on japan, with one exception. the global oil market is paying much more attention to bubbling co
and nato enter libya. >> woodruff: plus we look at military options for the u.s. and others, including establishing a no-fly zone over the north african nation. >> warner: marcia coyle gives us the latest from the supreme court, including today's 8-1 ruling upholding the free speech rights of protesters at military funerals. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the controversy surrounding dozens of no fishing zones off the coast of california. >> california is establishing dozens of protected areas in the ocean, but the problem is there aren't enough game wardens to enforce the rules. >> warner: and jeffrey brown talks to libyan-born u.s. poet khaled mattawa about life in libya under qaddafi and today's uprising. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institu
senators gary hart and norm coleman assess president obama's decision to use u.s. military power in libya. >> ifill: then, we get a report from a japan battered by nuclear disaster and now facing elevated radiation levels in its tap water. >> lehrer: miles o'brien looks at the future for u.s. nuclear power in the wake of the japan crisis. >> ifill: ray suarez reports on how the north african nation of morocco is working to avoid becoming the next target of regional unrest. >> reporter: in washington, morocco's foreign minister gave us an overview of king mohammed's planned reforms for a country facing some of the same discontents as its neighbors. >> you know what i feel like? i feel all the time like a cat on a hot tin roof! >> lehrer: and jeffrey brown remembers legendary film star elizabeth taylor who died today at age 79. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people des
with u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the radiation containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mars and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to ma
coastal town of -- a key coastal town. the libyan forces used tanks and artillery. our world affairs editors sent this report. >> at dawn this morning, it was a media elite clear that the rebels enthusiasm and fighting spirit was fading. it has carried them 150 miles westward along the coast, beating colonel gaddafi's troops back. but other supply lines are stretched and gaddafi's troops are fighting a more friendly territory. we went with the rebels to the next town, which they attacked fiercely. but the offender's head -- the defenders had better weapons. when we went there, we found the rebels had faded away during the night. from a distance collies i checkpoint which we eventually decided was probably manned by gaddafi loyalists. it was. a couple of soldiers opened fire in our direction. >> keep your head down. >> we drove back hastily down the road to the important oil town captured by the rebels on friday night. today, far fewer of them were making a stand here. the rebels are being forced all the way back to ras lanuf. it has been quite a success for colonel gaddafi's army. th
as global tensions heat up. >> it definitely gives us a moment to pause and reflect and actually take stock of where value really is in the capital markets. >> stock prices dropping 2% today is just an opportunity to pick them up a little cheaper. >> susie: we talk challenges and opportunities in stocks with a market bull and a market bear. you're watching "nightly business report" for thursday, march 10. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening. investors haven't seen a sell- off in stocks like today's since last summer. several worries were pressuring the markets today, violence in saudi arabia and renewed concerns about europe among them, susie. >> susie: tom, adding to the jitters-- worries about china's economic growth, and some disappointing news about the u.s. job market. the selling was broad-based-- the dow fell 228 points, closing below the 12,000 level; the n
and the crash of a u.s. military jet in the east. and we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali, who denounced moammar qaddafi last month. >> ifill: then, margaret warner looks at rifts within the nato alliance about the libya mission. >> brown: from japan, we get the latest on the cleanup in the hard-hit city of sendai. >> it might not seem much to you, but believe me it's a huge step that you now can actually drive up at the airport's departure terminal. >> ifill: and judy woodruff interviews japan's ambassador to the u.s., ichiro fujisaki. >> brown: special correspondent steve sapienza reports from bangladesh on the struggle to meet the basic needs of an exploding population. >> dahka is one of the world's fastest growing cities and one of the poorest. with 2,000 newcomers daily the struggle to find clean water in the slums often has life threatening consequences. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines what a merger between at&t and t-mobile would mean for consumers and the wireless industry. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshou
example of that. it used to be conventional wisdom you had to choose between mubarak and the muslim brotherhood. and with this huge amount of information that's been flowing in into egypt for several decades now, it's filled in the middle. there's now something that wasn't there before. >> rose: a program note. we expected to show you this evening conversations with mike huck bea. we'll show you those interviews later this week. tonight, lakhdar brahimi and joe nye when we continue. seven years ago, i had this idea. to make baby food the way moms would. happybaby strives to make the best organic baby food. in a business like ours, personal connections are so important. we use our american express open gold card to further those connections. last year we took dozens of trips using membership rewards points to meet with the farmers that grow our sweet potatoes and merchants that sell our product. we've gone from being in 5 stores to 7,500. booming is using points to make connections that grow your business. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city,
. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> rose: tell us exactly what the united nations security council is saying and what forces operating on the resolution are prepared to do? >> well, first i tnk it's demanding an immediate cease-fire to qaddafi, and today president obama, president sarkozy have reinforced this demand by asking qaddafi to stop the attack against benghazi, to evacuate three main cities out in the west of the country, and to restore water to the population. he is try to playing a game, qaddafi, so we want to set conditions which are not negotiable. so, first, cease-fire. secondly, we need peace, you know, to enforce the cease-fire. so there is not only the no-fly zone because everybody is speaking about the no-fly zone zone, but there is also a paragraph 4 which is saying the international community, which means the states which volunteer have-- can take all necessary measures, which means military measures, to protect the civilian population. which means tomorrow or the day after tomorrow, it's totally allowed by the security council. we are allowed to launch airstrikes against
and we believe radiation levels are extremely high. gwen: how japan's calamity could affect us all. covering the week, tom gjelten of npr, coral davenport of "national journal" and david wessel of "the wall street journal." >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week." produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875, we've been there for our clients through good times and bad. when their needs changed, we were there to meet them. through the years from insurance to investment management to real estate to retirement solutions, we've delved new ideas for the financial challenges ahead. this rock has never stood still and that's one thing that will never change. prudential. >> corporate funding is also provided by boeing. norfolk southern. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting, and by contributions to pbs stations from viewers like you
a special series examining the experience is of those who have come to call the u.s. home. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. in libya, state television is reporting you allied air strikes tonight, even as anti-government rebels) on what could be an important symbolic victory after a weekend of military gains. there have been moving steadily west, retaking towns they had earlier lost, moving from benghazi, the rebels are now in control of three other towns. the biggest victory could be the capture of sirte, colonel gaddafi's home town. >> taking the fight to colonel gaddafi's birthplace. rebels pounding targets near the town of sirte. a victory here would have huge the symbolic value. if the libyan leader cannot defend his home town, how long can he defend his regime? rebels said these were some of his supporters, mercenaries, they claimed, sent to kill, but defeated by poorly armed volunteers. we found rebel fighters racing to the front lines with a clear message for the libyan leader. a few weeks ago, a gesture like this would have gotten him killed. alo
and if hopefully you find it useful and if so it will allow people who would never have the opportunity to work at the fat duck to learn those techniques, apply in the their own cuisine, maybe take it in a totally different direction. >> rose: richard engel, barney frank, and nathan myhrvold when we continue. every story needs a hero we can all root for. who beats the odds and comes out on top. but this isn't just a hollywood storyline. it's happening every day, all across america. every time a storefront opens. or the midnight oil is burned. or when someone chases a dream, not just a dollar. they are small business owners. so if you wanna root for a real hero, support small business. shop small. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin with an update on the crisis in libya with richard engel of nbc news. first this, speaking at a joint press conference in chile, president obama defended the air strikes. >> i think it's very easy to square our military actions and our stated policies. our military action is in support
in a new book called "the social animal" about the power of the unconscious mind. >> the research shows us we don't have one core self, we have multiple selfs that are aroused by different stuff. i think the president has had more core selves. >> rose: he's many them? >> many people aroused by different things and i think the strength is he always has the ability to look at his other selves and they're all authentic i'm not saying it's fake, and sort of judge and... >> rose: which one is appropriate for this moment? >> or just did that one screw up? >> rose: david brooks for the hour next. seven years ago, i had this idea. to make baby food the way moms would. happybaby strives to make the best organic baby food. in a business like ours, personal connections are so important. we use our american express open gold card to further those connections. last year we took dozens of trips using membership rewards points to meet with the farmers that grow our sweet potatoes and merchants that sell our product. we've gone from being in 5 stores to 7,500. booming is using points to make connections t
since 2004 was we used, before 2004 we thought we knew which piece of sub duction zones could have these really big earthquakes. the sumatra earthquake and now this one, what the earth often does, we learn to be pretty humble in the face of the complexities of the earth. the earth has the ability to surprise us. i think none of us expected that anything this big would happen there. >> rose: we continue with the president of georgia, talking about his relationship with russia and the events of 2008. >> america's main value for peoples like us, and there are many of us out there, right s that america, besides having power or economic leverage, it's also an idea t is a much bigger than than just another country. that is what makes america so strong. there is more freedomses it there in the world, it's much more pragmatic. and that's, i think there is nothing that can stop freedom. it's inevitable this is going to happen. and america should lead it. and i think should not be scared of it. >> rose: we conclude with film producer peter guber talking about the art much storytelling. >> i
: federal prosecutors allege rajaratnam used inside information to trade 35 stocks. the feds plan to use 173 wiretapped conversations and testimony from confidential informants against rajaratnam. on the list of the government's potential witnesses is lloyd blankfein, the c.e.o. of goldman sachs. rajaratnam's net worth is estimated at $1.5 billion, and he has spent an estimated $20 million on his defense, so far. his lawyers are expected to argue rajaratnam was simply doing thorough research in his role as a hedge fund manager. the trial is likely to last six to eight weeks. it is the government's highest profile attempt to crackdown on illegal trading on wall street. here's how u.s. attorney preet bharara put it when charges were announced at the end of 2009. >> it would be a mistake to think that this investigation is focused only, or even principally on, hedge funds. we have gone far beyond that. in fact, this investigation goes to the very heart of fair play in the business world. >> susie: joining us now with more analysis, steven feldman. he's a former u.s. attorney who worked in new y
. : clts has done, secretary clinton, has been to hold back on the idea of us stepping forward unilaterally on this but saying, look, if we get the requisite support from the international community, including the arab league, then the predicate has been set for some kind of roll by us in this situation. it has been slow. i agree with rob. and probably what it does is, it slows the attainment of our objectives, and it maybe makes a sort of stalemated situation the best that can be achieved in the short term. but i think something has to be done to stop the rapid erosion of the opposition's position, and that's got to be done sooner than later. >> rose: the tragedy in japan, nuclear safety, and the middle east when we continue. if you've had a coke in the last 20 years, ( screams ) you've had a hand in giving college scholarships... and support to thousands of our nation's... most promising students. ♪ ( coca-cola 5-note mnemonic ) every story needs a hero we can all root for. who beats the odds and comes out on top. but this isn't just a hollywood storyline. it's happening every day, all
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 178 (some duplicates have been removed)